Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Mohamad Hafez is a Syrian artist and architect currently living in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. In his latest project, Hafez decided to set up miniature installations inside suitcases to tell stories of refugees and their homes left behind.

With metal objects, he built houses, furniture, buildings and landscapes that were part of the lives of so many people who had to leave to save their lives. Titled “UNPACKED: Refugee Baggage, ” the series of installations showcase the more humane and individual side of people who have had to seek refuge in other countries.

Art, fight and real life

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Syrian artist creates miniature facilities to talk about refugees

Hafez's work took months to complete, and each structure is accompanied by audio material with recordings made by refugees from Afghanistan, Congo, Syria, Iraq, and Sudan.

The stories were all recorded for Admed Badr, a refugee from Iraq who studies at Wesleyan University. They show the difficulties faced by those who have to leave everything behind and try to live elsewhere. On the project website you can hear the audios, and the material is on display at DePauw University until December this year.

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