Hell: See some stunning images of the California fires

You must have heard of the fires - again! - devastating burning in southern California. In fact, although the region is prone to such a disaster, it is unusual for them to happen so intensely in mid-December, when winter approaches in the northern hemisphere and temperatures are lower.

Winds from Santa Ana

Santa Ana winds recorded by NASA satellite in 2002 (Wikimedia Commons / NASA / JPL-Caltech)

But apparently there is an explanation for the fierce fires: there is a characteristic weather phenomenon in southern California and northern Baja California called “Santa Ana Winds”, which consists of extremely dry winds that typically hit the entire region during the fall and fall. early winter. For this year the strongest winds of recent years are being recorded - and, unfortunately, they are spreading the flames.

As a result, in recent days tens of thousands of people have had to leave their homes and hundreds of firefighters are working hard to contain the fires. In addition, a huge number of structures were engulfed in fire, not to mention the thousands of acres of woodland, fields and hills north of Los Angeles that are being consumed by flames. The images of this true “hell” are stunning and frightening - and you can check out a selection of them below:

(The Atlantic / Jae C. Hong / AP)

(The Atlantic / Jae C. Hong / AP)

(The Atlantic / David McNew / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / David McNew / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / David McNew / Getty)

(The Atlantic / David McNew / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / Noah Berger / AP)

(The Atlantic / Noah Berger / AP)

(The Atlantic / Gene Blevins / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / Gene Blevins / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / Gene Blevins / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / Mario Tama / Getty)

(The Atlantic / Jae C. Hong / AP)

(The Atlantic / Noah Berger / AP)

(The Atlantic / Chris Carlson / AP)

(The Atlantic / Gene Blevins / Reuters)

(The Atlantic / Noah Berger / AP)

(The Atlantic / Jae C. Hong / AP)

(The Atlantic / Reed Saxon / AP)

In addition to being closely monitored by news agencies and photographers, the devastation caused by the fires is also being monitored from space by satellites from NASA, the European Space Agency and climate organizations - and this “privileged” view allows us to better understand the immense proportion of the destruction. Look:

(Inverse)

(Inverse)

(Inverse)

There is even a map showing where fires are currently occurring, so that people avoid these danger zones and follow the situation:

And, of course, there are also countless haunting images being shared on social networks by locals or people passing through the region. Check out some records below:

The intense and surreal fire activity up on along the 33, north of Ojai. Winds gusting, roads covered with rocks, embers flying around. #thomasfire https://t.co/8D7oA15GwQ pic.twitter.com/gF4NEysHsV

- Marcus Yam (@yamphoto) December 7, 2017

#ThomasFire is now 26, 000 acres with 0% perimeter containment. Fire & Sheriff resources continue with impact area evacuations and structure protection operations. @VCFD #VCFD pic.twitter.com/qbdOJwPzBu

- VCFD PIO (@VCFD_PIO) December 5, 2017

#ThomasFire - mandatory evacuations ordered for East Ventura, north of foothill Road. The rapid rate of spread will push this fire into that area within a few hours. pic.twitter.com/wfYwI2S8vu

- VCFD PIO (@VCFD_PIO) December 5, 2017

Please get to safety. #ThomasFire pic.twitter.com/8lZOddSHvS

- Marcus Yam (@yamphoto) December 5, 2017

The Thomas Fire in Ventura has now burned 90, 000 acres on its way to the Pacific Ocean. Today fire officials are focused on preventing it from moving into the Ojai Valley. ??: @wallyskalij, @yamphoto, Michael Owen Baker / For the Times

A post shared by the Los Angeles Times (@latimes) on Dec 6, 2017 at 12:10 pm PST

We are packed and ready. It is two city blocks away. We and our property manager are staying awake and keeping an eye. We just spent some time with him on our roof and the flames are still strong. The wind shifts this way & that. We are very, very nervous, but as far as we can tell, safe at this time. #thomasfire

A post shared by Michelle A. Evans (@ventura_salt) on Dec 5, 2017 at 3:41 PST

CALIFORNIA FUEGO TORMMENT Spending this morning aiming at the cities where, my homeland (Ventura, California) and (Santa Paula) where my husband grew up ... Both cares in llamas. It is sad to see what is currently going through our county. #ThomasFire #SinSleep #VenturaCA #SantaPaulaCA #BendicionesBomberos

A post shared by @Consejera Sahara Del Sol (@saharadelsoloficial) on Dec 5, 2017 at 3:39 PST

#ThomasFire #MandatoryEvacuation #SantaPaula #Ventura #CA #StaySafe #SoSad. #Hometown #onfire.

A post shared by ARLENE ?? (@mytx_life) on Dec 5, 2017 at 3:18 PST

This is the worst thing to ever happen to our town. I managed to get up close and personal with all the devastation and I am extremely saddened by all of this. Everyone stay safe out there. I hope all of your homes are well ?? We'll stick together as a town and get through this together. Much love to all of Ventura and most importantly, thank you to all of the Firefighters out there doing all in their power to save all of them can. #ThomasFire

A post shared by Abel Guitron (@ abelguitron0) on Dec 5, 2017 at 3:19 PST