No fuel, Kepler telescope has 'death' decreed by NASA

The Kepler telescope, launched in space in 2009, has revolutionized the way we view the universe around us. Unfortunately, the device has now been officially confirmed by NASA as deactivated after it has entered Hibernation mode for lack of fuel.

When we first started designing this mission 35 years ago, we didn't know of a single planet outside our solar system.

The US space agency already knew the problem would happen sooner or later, as earlier this year reported that the telescope was approaching running out of fuel. This Tuesday (30) NASA made sure that Kepler will no longer wake up from its inert state.

What's out there?

It was this telescope that confirmed to scientists that the universe is full of Earth-like planets. Kepler was responsible for discovering over 2, 600 other planets outside our Solar System, and a large portion of them could potentially contain extraterrestrial life. The device has obtained so much data for scientists that they still work on that information to this day. Scientists rushed to be able to download all the data captured by the telescope before it went into hibernation forever.

“When we first started designing this mission 35 years ago, we didn't know of a single planet outside our solar system, ” retired mission founder Kepler William Borucki said in a news release. "Now that we know which planets are everywhere, Kepler has put us on a new course that is promising for future generations to explore our galaxy."

Heir to height

To take on Kepler's important role as a planet hunter, the TESS telescope is already in operation looking around for other Earth-like stars to perhaps discover off-planet life - or even find a replacement for our home, since we mistreat so much this little blue ball lost in the confines of space.

***

Do you know the Mega Curioso newsletter? Weekly, we produce exclusive content for lovers of the biggest curiosities and bizarres of this big world! Register your email and do not miss this way to keep in touch!

No fuel, Kepler telescope has 'death' decreed by NASA via TecMundo